Posts Tagged ‘writers’

Scene Stealer at Book Lovers Book Reviews

October 10, 2010


“The World is Beautiful Today…” Received a 4/5 rating for Scene Stealer at http://www.bookloverbookreviews.com Book Lover is a reviewer-Joanne P. who is an Australia. Jo also did an interview with me and I couldn’t be more pleased. Please take a trip Down Underand leave a comment.
I’ve been to that marvelous, magical country three times and have fallen in love with it from the tropical rain forest to Alice. From kangeroos and koalas to the smallest penguins in the world.
If you’d like to know more about me, please log on to http://www.elisewarner.com My cozy mystery is available at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.borders.com, http://www.carinapress.com
Download hot ebooks from Carina Press
and wherever eBooks are sold. An audio version will be released by http://www.audible.com on Oct. 15

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TENT SHOW

October 8, 2010

Platea is two gas stations and a general store somewhere in the area of Erie, Pennsylvania. Not even a dot on the map. Hard to find-I know-I could never find the place again.
When I was in my middle teens, I was offered a job for the summer as ingénue with a traveling tent show whose owners lived in a small ramshackle house in Platea. Ready, willing and eager, I joined the troupe of seven that included a leading lady and leading man, a juvenile, two character actors and a utility man. We rehearsed for a week in a second and larger house that hadn’t seen tenants for a long while; we cooked on a kerosene stove and our personnel needs were taken care of in an outhouse in back where seven rats resided, or so our leading man claimed. He gave each rat a name; the names were originally ours alone.
We would present plays like Uncle Tom’s Cabin-I doubled playing Little Eve and Eliza. I would cross the ice with a doll-representing a baby-in my arms as I tried to escape the bloodhounds chasing us, race down the stairs, discard my bandana and the smock, that covered Little Eva’s white dress, place the doll on a table, pull on a blonde wig and return to the stage where I rested my dying body on a pallet.
One memorable performance the stairs weren’t in place and I stepped from the stage into space. I ignored the pain, quickly made the fast change and clambered back on stage. The lights came up. Uncle Tom began singing a hymn, looked at me and then began to stifle giggles. Blood seeped through the dress adding a bit of authenticity to my role and distressing the owners.
During intermissions, we would sell an orange drink concoction and bags of popcorn; twice a week, after the show-for an additional half-dollar-we would put on an afterpiece that included comedy sketches, songs and dances. The theme of one afterpiece was the roaring twenties; we’d dress ourselves in flapper costumes, dance the Charleston and sing a number that went
We’re working our way through college,
To get a lot of knowledge,
That we’ll probably never, ever use again.
There were six different plays-one for each night of the show week. Among them, The Cohens and The Kellys similar to a Broadway play titled Abie’s Irish Rose that defied critics and ran for years and Your Country Cousin about a bumpkin that outsmarts everyone. Saturday nights, we tore down the set after the performance-I was in charge of making sandwiches for the crew-then we drove to the next town. I sat next to the popcorn machine. The next morning, it was my job to walk through the streets, find strong teen-age boys and offer them free tickets to the show in exchange for help in putting up the tent and the benches. I thought of myself as the Pied Piper of Pennsylvania.
Just like Broadway, our motto was “The Show Must Go On” and go on it did no matter how sick we were. I came down with the flu in one town and spent several days in bed. Out leading lady was kind enough to iron my costumes but at night I trod the boards. One afternoon as I lay on the bed sleeping, a noise woke me up and I saw several children sneaking a quick look at me from the doorway. The enterprising young son of our boarding house owner had sold a few tickets at twenty-five cents apiece–for a chance to peep at the ingénue-to his friends.
On a road trip to Erie one year, my husband and I tried to find Platea; I wanted to show him the old house where we rehearsed, the general store where we bought chips, bologna and sodas, the outhouse I avoided as much as humanly possible. But Platea was changed or gone and-except in my memory-I couldn’t go back.

For more information about me, please log on to http://www.elisewarner.com My mystery titled SCENE STEALER is availbel at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.borders.com, http://www.carinapress.com
Carina Press: Your next great read!
and wherever eBooks are sold An audio version will be released by http://www.audible.com on Oct. 15.
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Housework

October 6, 2010

I will do almost anything to keep from cleaning. Dusting, using the vacuum cleaner, washing the floors, sinks, and toilets. And I can just about sew on a button-my grandmother saved me from flunking sewing class in school. Cooking is fun and sometimes a way to relax but I want to spend my time writing. A mystery, a non-fiction article and a blog.
Walking, for me, lends itself to ideas and reading stimulates. Theatre and museums and dinner in a lovely, comfortable restaurant are my favorite ways to spend leisure time. Travel is exciting and opens my mind to new ideas, new foods, lives that are different from mine and yet-the same in so many ways.
I caught the travel bug at an early age and have never stopped wanting to travel. So many stories Is it inspiration? Perhaps it’s the adventure.
For more information about me: Please log on to http://www.elisewarner.com

SCENE STEALER, my mystery is available at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.borders.com, http://www.carinaprress.com
Carina Press: Your next great read!
and wheerever eBooks are sold

SHY

October 4, 2010


“Shy, I confess it, I’m shy…” that song from Once Upon a Mattress seemed to have been written about me. But that was before I began writing and a play I wrote was chosen by Theatre Guinevere, in New York City, as an entrant in a play contest. We, the authors, would all read our plays in a rehearsal room to a critic who would choose the top three plays. The prize-a staged reading.
I sat in front of an audience consisting of friends, family, budding playwrights and the other competitors. I read the lines; hoping my nerves wouldn’t show. Stage directions were read by a friend and I learned never to have stage directions read at a reading. Find another way. Then miracle of miracles, I was one of the winners.
The next step was finding professional actors-who were willing to work without pay. An ad was place in Backstage, a theatrical newspaper; the evening we held auditions we arrived to find actors had filled the room and lined the staircase.
I was used to auditioning as a singer and an actress; after I became a stage manager, I knew how to call other performers to read for directors, conductors and choreographers. I knew how to cheer for performers and how to console but nothing prepared me for making the hard decisions myself.
We chose the actors we wanted to stay and read for the parts in our plays-typecasting-choosing by age, height, weight, appearance and instinct. I chose three young girls to stay and read for my ingénue. The first was terrible, just plain terrible.
“Thank you,” I said.
She pretended not to hear.
“Thank you,” a bit louder. Would nothing stop this…this creature who was creating havoc with my lines? The lines I had spent hour after hour writing and revising?
I rose from my chair, walked up front and shouted in her ear. “Thank you!” I no longer felt shy. The third actress to read, made me smile, made me laugh and was perfect. Absolutely perfect.
On to the men and here I made a dreadful mistake. The actor I chose looked the part, he read the lines fairly well and he told me he could sing. I hadn’t written a musical but the actor needed to look as if he could dance, have a mediocre voice and hold a tune for a chorus or two. I made the mistake of taking the actor at his word-I should have known better-and after the first rehearsal, despite his plea, had to let him go.
I had never-is the right word fired-anyone before? And it was a part in a staged reading that didn’t pay a cent. I felt guilty. I felt tough. I knew my first duty was to my play. And I knew I would never be shy again.

P.S. I got up the nerve to ask a marvelous actor I had worked with on the road if he would do the reading and he agreed. We won the prize – a small statue called, “The Guinny” the play received several staged readings with other companies but as yet hasn’t been produced.

FOR MORE INFO ABOUT ME, PLEASE LOG ON TO http://www.elisewarner.com MY MYSTERY TITLED SCENE STEALER MAY BE PURCHSED AT www,barnesandnoble.com, wwwamazon.com, http://www.borders.com, http://www.carinapress.com
Carina Press: Your next great read!
and wherever eBooks are sold an audio versiion will be released by http://www.audible.com on October 15

Story Time With Mom

September 30, 2010

Rainy days were storytime days. A day to hear my mom’s stories about her childhood in New York and the family’s adventures in Bristol, R.I. Like the time, mom was walking her youngest brother, Johnny, to school and they cut across a field. Mom was wearing a bright red dress and it attracted the attention of a bull. The bull wasn’t open to endearments so mom grabbed Johnny’s hand and they ran and ran until they found the Veteran’s Home where a group of elderly Veteran’s lived. They were entertained with tales of war and heroism and plied with cookies and milk. Mother never tired of telling Johnny, after he served, that there would always be a place for him in the home.
Then there was the story of Uncle Morris and his cigar store. Uncle Morris was probably the only person in New York City who did not like Fiorello LaGuardia. It seems the Mayor did not approve of pool tables and dumped them in the river. Since the table added a good deal to Morris’s living, he had no use for the Mayor. I can imagine what he would think about our currnet Mayor Bloomberg and the ban on smoking. After the cigar stor closed, Uncle Morris went into the cloak and suit business. He became very popular with all the his wive’s- Betty- sisters. he was the one to turn to when a button needed sewing or a dress needed to be shortened.
Mom had a story about everyone in the family and I wish she were here so she could read mine. I hope, somewhere, somehow, she knows I’ve become a writer. to learn more about me, please log on to http://www.elisewarner.com Scene Stealer, my mystery is available at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.borders.com, http://www.carinapress.com and wherever eBooks arre sold. An audio version is being produced by audible.com and will be available Oct.15.

Carina Press: Your next great read!

Make Yourself At Home

September 27, 2010


We’re in Rotorua, New Zealand and our day had begun with a not to be missed learning experience at the Whakarewarewa Thermal Village; a living Maori village bordered by hot thermal springs, bubbling mud pools and steaming vapor discharged through vents. Guides welcome us with the story of Rangi, their sky father, and Papatuanuki, the earth mother and the tribe’s history. For me, a writer, I listen to the stories with the anticipation of a child.
Several guides talk of a personal genealogical past that goes back 25 generations. Forty thousand years ago, the Maori of WhakarewarewaValley believed that here the Goddesses of fire, Te Pupu and Te Hoa rose from the center of the earth. As they drew and exhaled breath, geysers, mud pools and hot springs were born. Seven, amongst the approximately 65 vents are active and there are at least 500-mud pools. Visitors are impressed with Po Hutu which sometimes erupts to 98.3 feet. Residents use the hot steam from Roturua’s thermal wonderland to heat homes, cook, warm hot tubs, and immerse themselves in geothermal mud baths for a relaxing beauty treatment.
Te Puia, adjacent to Whakarewarewa, presents three Maori Cultural Performances a day. Stories are told through song and movement with the beguiling Poi dance, a war dance (Haka) and games performed with sticks where the dexterous performer dances with eight high flying rods.
Conservation is of major importance at Te Puia; in 1976, the Kiwi House opened; the house became a sanctuary for injured birds and by 1999, a breeding program was introduced. Te Puia is committed to the survival of New Zealand’s national symbol as well as other birds that live and thrive in this sheltered and natural environment.
Ancient arts and crafts are taught at Te Puia to insure the preservation of Maori traditions for future generations. Masters teach a three-year course in carving to 12 full-time students from all over New Zealand; The School of Weaving offers practical hands on teaching. Designs that stem from each tribe’s history are often employed and the work is exhibited all over the world. The shop offers artwork that ranges from carved wall hangings to serving bowls to woven art. The crafts are all beautifully fashioned by students and graduates.
A perfect day in Rotorua, 220 miles S.E. of Auckland, New Zealand in the heart of the Taupo Volcanic zone, was drawing to an end for two happy travelers. My husband and I finish a superb dinner at Zanellis, accompanied by a refreshingly different New Zealand fruit wine. The restaurant has appealed to hungry diners in downtown Rotorua for over twenty years. Satisfied, we stroll through the square; stop and enjoy line dancing performed by a group of Maori women to the strains of Begin the Beguine. The sound of a jazz band beckons us to the far corner of the square; the music is irresistible and we join the locals dancing in the street.
To learne more about me, please log on to http://www.elisewarner.com My eBook titled Scene Stealer is available at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.borders.com, http://www.carinapress.com and wherever eBooks are sold
Carina Press: Your next great read!

A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME

September 23, 2010

Recently took another look at the beginning of a draft of a new novel. There are about fourteen rough chapters and I wanted to see if the novel was worth finishing. I like my characters-they’re very real to me and I hope that when the novel is completed and hopefully published, readers will feel the same way.
I put the novel away when another-a mystery-was (to my great delight) chosen for publication and I became caught up in rewrites, networking and marketing. Then there were bread and butter articles to write, research and the keeping up with contacts. Put the characters have stayed in my mind and I’m beginning to work on the chapter again.
On beginning research for Chapter Five, I noticed the names of two of my people had changed from Chapter Three; now who had changed them? It had to be me. So I’m back to Chapter Three after realizing the names in Chapter Five were much better suited to the characters. Perhaps while I was busy with my mystery, my characters changed their own names-they do tend to take over.
To learn more about me-please log on to http://www.elisewarner.com My eBook Mystery titled Scene Stealer is available at http://www.carinapress.com, http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.borders.com and wherever eBooks are sold.

Storeybook Reviews Scene Stealer

August 5, 2010

Scene Stealer – Elise Warner Posted in Cozy, New York on August 4, 2010 Before Elise Warner started her writing career you could find her on Broadway, working with National Companies and in clubs as an actress, singer and stage manager. She has even written a play which won Theatre Guinevere’s “Guinny Award”. After that she started writing for various magazines but this is her first novel.

Scene Stealer features Miss Augusta Weidenmaier, a retired school teacher who is caught up on the case of a kidnapped child, an actor in fact, and feels that she must help the police solve this crime. She does this putting her self in harms way a time or two, and as expected of a school teacher, a rap or two on the knuckles of some not some helpful characters.

When I first started reading this book I wasn’t sure what to expect, in fact, I wasn’t even aware that this was the author’s first novel. The story started off with Augusta noticing a child on the bus and as a former schoolteacher knew that something wasn’t quite right. The child looked scared and the man he was with was a bit scary himself. She departs the bus to try and follow the pair to see if she can help the child. In the back of her mind she recognizes the child but does not realize he is an actor for a local fast food chain until his disappearance is publicized in the media. Then she realizes what she saw could help find Kevin and bring him back to his mother. She doesn’t realize the danger that she ends up putting herself in to until it is too late.

I was beginning to wonder why someone would want to read this book if the kidnapper was going to be revealed so early in the book. But imagine mysurprise when the obvious wasn’t as obvious as you might think. It was a nice twist that I wasn’t expecting and pulled me back in to the story wondering how it was going to end.

I give this book 3 1/2 stars and if the author decides to make this a series, I will definitely check out the second installment.
Scene Stealer may be purchased at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.carinapress.com, http://www.borders.com and wherever eBooks are sold

Percolating

August 4, 2010

Ideas for articles, characters to bring a story alive, another cozy? Another novel? I’ve started on an article. Moving fast. This one is fun to write. The story is almost there? But something is missing. My characters have to decide what they want to do. Atmosphere? Menace? do I need to know more about my people? And what about another cozy? Miss Weidenmaier is getting restless. And the novel…it’s a story I want to tell. The world of writing is exciting. Mystifying. Funny and wondrous. I’m so glad it chose me.
To learn more about me fo to http://www.elisewarner.com

Scene Stealer is available at http://www.barnesandnoble.com, http://www.amazon.com, http://www.carinapress.com, http://www.borders.com and wherever eBooks are sold

Stones, Quills, Fountain Pens, Whatever

July 25, 2010

Bought an eReader last Friday and that got me to thinking about all the writing implements that have been used by creative people since the days of ancestors with artistic aspirations. Artists and writers who scratched pictures on the walls of caves with sharpened stones. Were the drawings memoirs of times gone by? Victory in battle? Man against the animals he fought? A prehistoric still life?
Quills and bamboo, brushes and pencils all used with the hope that someone, somewhere, someday would read the author’s work.
Today, fountain pens belong in collections. Old typewriters have gone the way of the dinosaur, grandparents reminisce about IBM Selectrics, word processors are in the attic. We use a PC, a laptop, a notepad an iPad and we write.
And we read…hardcover, paperbacks, eBooks, we download and upload and text. We read and write to explore, escape, find romance, adventure, love, experience and knowledge. Thank heaven for writers and readers.
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